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Swimming Upstream

A series of reports on the health of the Great Lakes fishery. Support for coverage of Great Lakes fishery issues comes from the Great Lakes Fishery Trust .

VIRAL DISEASE KILLING GREAT LAKES FISH
VIRAL DISEASE KILLING GREAT LAKES FISH

A disease is spreading, causing large fish kills in the Great Lakes. Biologists and fishery officials are working to prevent further spread of the disease, but there's a conflict between government agencies. Lester Graham reports there's also a cost to businesses that deal in live fish:


KEEPING INVASIVE SPECIES OUT
KEEPING INVASIVE SPECIES OUT

Harbors in the United States risk biological pollution every time a foreign ship comes into port. The ships often carry foreign aquatic animals that can cause environmental and economic damage. Lester Graham reports the problem is known, acknowledged, and still the government has not taken the measures needed to stop the problem:

INVASIVES DESTROYING GREAT LAKES FOOD CHAIN
INVASIVES DESTROYING GREAT LAKES FOOD CHAIN

Although zebra mussels have been affecting the ecology of the Great Lakes since they were first found in 1988, researchers are continuously surprised at how much damage they've caused. Now, biologists are wondering if zebra mussels and the more recently arrived quagga mussels are to blame for a collapse of the fishery in one of North America's largest lakes.

INVASIVE DIE-OFF STIRS FISHERY DEBATE
INVASIVE DIE-OFF STIRS FISHERY DEBATE

The fisheries in the Great Lakes are seeing dramatic changes. In one lake, an invasive species that has become part of the food chain has collapsed. But some native fish are doing better because of that collapse. Lester Graham reports some fishery managers are debating what to do next:

MULTIMILLION DOLLAR PARASITE FIGHT CONTINUES
MULTIMILLION $ PARASITE FIGHT

One of the most destructive invasive species in the Great Lakes was also the first one to arrive. The sea lamprey invaded the Lakes more than a hundred years ago. It's the only invader in the Lakes that managers have been able to control... but it takes millions of taxpayers' dollars every year to keep the blood-sucking parasite in check, and there's no end in sight:

ROOTS OF THE GREAT LAKES FISHERY
ROOTS OF THE GREAT LAKES FISHERY

Head to almost any body of water and chances are you'll find someone there fishing. We take it for granted that lakes and streams have fish in them. But most waterways can't produce enough fish to keep up with demand. For more than 100 years states around the nation have been stocking the water with fish. Tamar Charney reports:

THE INVASION OF THE QUAGGAS
THE INVASION OF THE QUAGGAS

Whitefish is a main dish for everything from fish boils to fancy dinners all around the Great Lakes region. But in some areas of the Great Lakes, whitefish aren't doing so well. Rebecca Williams reports on what's happening to the fish many people love to eat:

EASING EEL PASSAGE TO FRESH WATER

The American eel migrates from the salty Sargasso Sea into the fresh waters of the eastern U.S. and Canada. But their numbers have dropped significantly. Now, the eel is getting help from dam operators.

DISAPPEARING ACT AT BOTTOM OF FOOD CHAIN

A researcher says the decline of some tiny aquatic animals at the bottom of the food chain continues in the Great Lakes.

FISH-EATING BIRD DISRUPTING FOOD CHAIN?

The once near-extinct double-crested cormorant has made a dramatic comeback in the past few decades, and sport fisherman say the fish-eating birds are hurting their business. But as states move to limit their cormorant populations, there's still no solid research that the birds are really to blame.

FRESHWATER MUSSELS NOT HAPPY-AS-CLAMS

Researchers have been finding trace amounts of pharmaceuticals in rivers and lakes. Now, a new report suggests that the presence of Prozac in water bodies might be endangering freshwater mussels.

COURT ORDERS EPA TO ISSUE BALLAST RULE

A federal court has ordered the Environmental Protection Agency to start regulating the discharge of ballast water from ships. Rebecca Williams reports it's the first time the agency has had to take responsibility for the problem:

GREAT LAKES FISH "QUARANTINED" BY USDA

Regulators are worried about a fish disease found in the lakes that could spread to other areas. Federal officials are trying to figure out the next step after banning certain shipments of fish in the Great Lakes region.

SAVING THE AMERICAN EEL

Biologists in Canada are taking extreme measures to prevent the disappearance of a mysterious fish. For the first time ever, they've stocked one of the Great Lakes with American eels. David Sommerstein reports:

FISH DISEASE PROMPTS BAN ON BALLAST WATER

An emerging fish disease known as viral hemorrhagic septicemia, or VHS, has prompted a proposed ban on the use of ballast water in the Great Lakes. Chuck Quirmbach reports the proposed ban is leading to predictions of economic disruption:

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