Energy Tax Credits for Next Year

  • Tucked away in the bailout package were energy tax cuts for Americans (Source: Man-ucommons at Wikimedia Commons)

We’ve all heard about the 700-
billion dollar bail-out for Wall Street.
Getting a lot less attention was another
17-billion dollars for energy tax credits.
Lester Graham reports you can take advantage
of some of that money for your house:

Transcript

We’ve all heard about the 700-
billion dollar bail-out for Wall Street.
Getting a lot less attention was another
17-billion dollars for energy tax credits.
Lester Graham reports you can take advantage
of some of that money for your house:

Starting in January you can earn as much as $500 in tax credits for home
improvements that save energy. The credit will be taken right off the top of taxes you’ll
owe for 2009.


Ronnie Kweller is with the group Alliance to Save Energy. She says the credits can
cover a lot.


“Energy Star windows. It also includes lower-cost products like additional insulation,
sealing and caulking and weather-stripping – all those kind of things to tighten up your
home and make it energy efficient. As well as highly-efficient heating and cooling
equipment.”


Kweller says her group has details on the new consumer tax credits on its website:
ase.org.


Keep your receipts, and you’ll have to remember to file the right IRS form to take
advantage of the tax credits.


For The Environment Report, I’m Lester Graham.

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A Treatment for Bleeding Fish Disease?

  • Signs of VHS, from the Michigan DNR (Photo courtesy of the US Fish and Wildlife Service)

A common treatment in fish hatcheries may slow – or even stop –

the spread of an invasive virus that’s killing fish across the Great Lakes.

Jonathan Brown has more:

Transcript

A common treatment in fish hatcheries may slow – or even stop –

the spread of an invasive virus that’s killing fish across the Great Lakes.

Jonathan Brown has more:

It’s called Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia. Humans can’t catch it, but it
causes internal bleeding in fish.

The virus is hurting the region’s multi-billion-dollar sport fishing industry.

Now, researchers are finding that adding iodine – a common practice in fish
hatcheries – could prevent the virus from spreading.

Steve LePan is a biologist for the state of New York. He says a study at
Cornell University found Walleye eggs treated with an iodine solution were
not infected with VHS.

“We can’t say for sure that it’s exclusively the iodine that kills it. There may
be other things we do to the eggs that also affect the virus, as well.”

Those ‘other’ treatments include bathing Walleye eggs in Tannic Acid for a
few minutes before incubation.

LePan says there’s still a lot to learn about VHS, but he’s cautiously
optimistic that hatcheries can breed fish uninfected by the disease.

For The Environment Report, I’m Jonathan Brown.

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